Wild Camping Scotland

Wild Camping Scotland

Category: Wild Camping Sites

Altanour Lodge

Altanour Lodge near Braemar – Wild Camping Bothy Site

Wildcamping Site: Location


 

Prevailing Weather


Description

Altanour Lodge is an abandoned shooting lodge at the top of Glen Ey.  It’s a ruin now which makes it a perfect site for wild camping.  The location is commanding; it’s surrounded by Munros (An Socach, Carn Bhac, Beinn Iutharn Mhor, Beinn Iutharn Bheag and Carn an Righ), has a lovey burn running close by, and has plenty of timber to hand for fires.  

Around the ruin itself there are flat patches of grass and grassy embankments.  There’s usually at least one patch in the local vicinity which happens to be out of the wind that day.

To get there you have a choice.  You can either walk or bike it.  The walk is flat enough, but quite long so it’ll take a bit of time.  If you mountain bike it in then you’ll save about 2 hours on the hike. 

Altanour Lodge Present Day
Altanour Lodge Present Day
Altanour Lodge in 1952
Altanour Lodge in 1952

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For many years the Lodge has been used as a bothy for hikers in the Cairngorms.  In this time it’s slowly fallen apart.  You can clearly see from these pictures that even in 1952 the harsh weather had taken its toll, but that now there’s only a shell.  Enough for shelter while you get a brew on though.

Altanour Lodge
Altanour Lodge in Spring
Altanour Lodge Wooded Area
Altanour Lodge Wooded Area

Tanera Beg Summer Isles

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You are unlikely to encounter another soul here on the second largest of the Summer Isles. Unlike its larger neighbour Tanera More, the island is completely uninhabited. The bay at Mol Bheag offers a safe landing point for kayaks and above the shoreline there are plenty of potential pitches amid the heather. Wander up to the island’s highest points (just 83 metres above sea level) and savour views across neighbouring Eilean Fada Mor and Tanera More to the mainland and the characteristic cut-off cone of Stac Pollaidh. On the paddle home, stop off at Tanera More where there’s a tearoom serving home baking.

 

Glen Almond Perthshire

Location


 

Description

A popular right of way runs through Glen Almond, linking the Sma’ Glen with Loch Tay. Camping lower down Glen Almond is no real fun; there are farms and rather too many sheep. However, at the top of the glen, where the valley’s main track ends and a path begins, the landscape is altogether wilder and more remote. There’s plenty of flat land just off the path west of the weir below Dundornie and it is here that you’ll find your perfect pitch for the night. Lively hill streams provide running water and, if you’re feeling fit, Ben Chonzie, a Munro, is within easy reach.

Prevailing Weather


Prevailing Weather


 

Description

Glen Feshie is a traditional Scottish glen, flanked by craggy mountains, dotted with Scots Pine trees and home to wandering herds of red deer. It was here that Edward Landseer created his famous Monarch of the Glen painting of a proud stag. One of the best places to camp is by Ruigh-aiteachain bothy. There are plenty of flat grassy pitches amongst the pine trees and the bothy is always open, should you need to retreat from the elements to the comfort of a roaring log fire. The bothy provides a good starting point for the Munros of Sgor Gaoith and Mullach Clach a’Bhlair and, across the glen, Carn Dearg Mor, a Corbett.

 

Prevailing Weather